Conondale Range Great Walk
  • Length: 56km

  • Duration: 3 days

  • Grade: 4

  • Style: Circuit

  • Start: Unnamed Road, Cambroon

  • End: Unnamed Road, Cambroon

  • Closest Town:

  • Location: Conondale National Park

  • Distance from state capital: 134 km

  • State: QLD

  • Latitude: -26.64508054

  • Longitude: 152.6506948

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Conondale Range Great Walk is a 56km, grade 4 Circuit hike located in Conondale National Park Queensland. The hike should take approximately 3 days to complete.

Summary

In this rugged Range are some of Queensland’s most popular and picturesque forests. Luxuriant rainforests, tall eucalypt forest, waterfalls, boulder-strewn creeks and spectacular scenery make this area worth a visit. With magnificent forests, deep gorges and spectacular views, this park offers walking tracks, scenic drives and grassy camp sites near rainforests and mountain streams.

About the region

Conondale National Park is 130 km north of Brisbane in the Sunshine Coast Hinterland near the town of Conondale in the south east Queensland bioregion. The park covers an area of 35,648 hectares protecting large areas of subtropical rainforest, woodlands, wet and dry sclerophyll forest including Queensland’s tallest tree. The park contains areas of regenerating forest which have been previously logged; areas of forest plantations also border the park. The park is currently managed by the Department of National Parks, Recreation, Sports and Racing (NPRSR) under the Nature Conservation Act 1992.

Since the 1860s the Conondale region has been impacted by land clearing for agriculture, mining and logging, today the park is a refuge for many species now rare and threatened. Threatened species such as the plumed frogmouth, giant barred frog, Conondale crayfish, spotted-tailed quoll, Gympie nut and richmond birdwing butterfly have been recorded in the park and are currently targeted for conservation management to mitigate threats to their survival. Species of interest include the southern gastric brooding frog which mysteriously disappeared in 1981 and is presumed extinct.

The landscape has a rugged topography with gorges, valleys and a number of mountains above 700m with the highest peak being Mount Langley at 868m. Throughout the park there are scenic waterfalls such as Booloumba Creek Falls, cascades and numerous boulder strewn creeks. The Conondale range forms a catchment divide between the Brisbane River and Mary River with the southernmost tributaries of the Mary river forming in Booloumba and Yabba creek.[6] The park also contains wetlands of national significance. These tributaries are important for the threatened Mary river cod which has declined in these creeks.

Gold mining at Kilcoy Creek, 1933
The region has a sub-tropical climate with a mean annual rainfall of 1,500 mm, the majority of rainfall occurs seasonally in summer (December–March) usually with heavy downpours and winters generally cold and dry with occasional frosts. Major vegetation types include a mix of complex notophyll vine forest, sub-tropical rainforest, woodlands, bangalow palm forests, wet sclerophyll and dry sclerophyll forest with rainforest occurring mainly at higher altitudes and along watercourses.

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For more information on this hiking trail, please visit Queensland.com

 

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